R-U, Rah, Rah: Proud to be a Scarlet Knight!

"On Sunday, I took an awed look around a scarlet red stadium of parents and about 10,000 students and for a brief sentimental moment took in the fact that I was graduating. As students responded U to the call of R, I realized how much I loved Rutgers and how proud I was of the … Continue reading R-U, Rah, Rah: Proud to be a Scarlet Knight!

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A Lesson From Rejection

No one talks about rejection, so I will. For starters, here's what a rejection looks like: I was so upset after receiving this letter. Not necessarily because I didn't get into Harvard, but because I just could not shake the "YOU'RE NOT GOOD ENOUGH" feeling that came with the decision. My rejection made me question … Continue reading A Lesson From Rejection

How to Politely Withdraw from a Med School

It's March 16th. At this time, it's important and considerate not to keep holding on to spots at schools you're certain of not attending. Composing the ideal withdrawal letter after accepting a place at medical school can be a bit anxiety provoking. Being polite about withdrawals, however, is extremely important because some residency programs are … Continue reading How to Politely Withdraw from a Med School

Extracurriculars: Standing out to the Adcom

When I began seriously considering medicine as a career sophomore year, one of the first things I looked up was what it took to get accepted into medical school. Time and time again, many mentors familiar with the med school application process stressed how important extracurriculars were to getting accepted. Gone are the days where … Continue reading Extracurriculars: Standing out to the Adcom

What’s The Cost?

"If it costs you your peace, it is too expensive" We all have our reasons for doing things-more experience, more money, more something--but, we often don't take the time to consider the price of that something more. I just started a new job last week because I felt an urgency to save up more money … Continue reading What’s The Cost?

Succeeding in College II: Planning ahead, Course Load & Professors

In part one of this series, I talked about planning and staying organized. Organization and concrete plans are essential as they tie into almost every aspect of college success. Today, I want to discuss how you can use those planning and organization skills to make your four-year plan, balance your course load, and select the … Continue reading Succeeding in College II: Planning ahead, Course Load & Professors

Succeeding in College Part 1: My Freshman Year Wake-Up Call

Like many freshmen, I came into college ill-prepared for college courses. I got through high school without doing much; I studied the night before tests, did my homework during lunch and still got As in most of my classes. Naturally, I came into college a little overconfident. I thought I could do it all. So … Continue reading Succeeding in College Part 1: My Freshman Year Wake-Up Call

Paradigm Shift: The New Traditional Applicant

At many of the medical schools I interviewed at, I noticed an interesting trend. The traditional applicants, who’d taken the conventional college to medical school route, were outnumbered by the non-traditional applicants. Given that the term nontraditional can be equivocal, I’d like to clarify that I use the term to refer to individuals who choose … Continue reading Paradigm Shift: The New Traditional Applicant